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Marion found respite during a time of trouble. George found his life partner. Marjorie found something she'd thought she'd lost forever. They all found more than they bargained for when they joined the New Horizons Music Program, a program for senior musicians whose skills range from novice to seasoned. Marion, George, Marjorie and others share how they found a new connection to music and so much more in the hour-long documentary, MUSIC FOR LIFE: THE STORY OF NEW HORIZONS. What started as a 30-member band in Rochester, New York more than 20 years ago has grown to a program that includes 10,000 musicians in 215 New Horizons bands across the United States, as well as Canada, Ireland, Australia, and several other countries. The New Horizons program defies the notion that "retirement means sitting on your sofa all day, watching television, and waiting to die." Whether New Horizons' members have rekindled, or found for the first time, their passion for music and performing - they are part of something bigger than themselves. Along the way, they have discovered new abilities, formed life-long friendships, and proved to us all that life is a journey, not a race. The New Horizons program defies the notion that "retirement means sitting on your sofa all day, watching television, and waiting to die." That's how Dr. Roy Ernst, professor emeritus at Eastman School of Music and New Horizons founder, puts it. His philosophy, as he explains in the documentary, is that anyone can learn to play music at a personal level that will bring a sense of accomplishment. "When you play a great piece of music you're in the presence of something far greater than yourself," explains Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra conductor Laureate Christopher Seaman. And, that's exactly what New Horizons' members experience.

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